Monday, May 16, 2011

Industry propaganda about EPA ghg rules: starting to look like bs

Politico Pro notes this morning that

Predictions that the Obama administration’s climate rules would bring the U.S. economy screeching to a halt haven’t come true — at least not yet.

A few more excerpts are below. This well-reported piece confirms another story published in late March by Inside Energy which concluded that "permits belie claims about EPA carbon regulations."

The industry propaganda, paid for at a high price, is running into a basic reality -- It's just a lot of hot air.

Here are a few brief excerpts from Politico Pro. A subscription is required for the full tex:


EPA program off to a slow, but smooth, start

EPA’s backers say the first round of greenhouse gas permits have been a success.

By ROBIN BRAVENDER | 5/16/11

Predictions that the Obama administration’s climate rules would bring the U.S. economy screeching to a halt haven’t come true — at least not yet.
Opponents of the EPA's climate rules have kept up their fiery rhetoric since the regulations officially kicked in on Jan. 2. Congressional critics warn the climate rules will halt construction and hamstring an economic recovery, and they’ve vowed to use every possible legislative avenue to unravel them, including the debt ceiling fight later this summer.

But off the Hill, the EPA and its backers say the agency has gotten off to a smooth — if slow — start to ratcheting down greenhouse gas emissions without imposing undue burdens on industries.

So far this year, state permitting agencies have issued three air pollution permits that account for greenhouse gas emissions, according to the EPA. Those permits went to a Nucor Corp. iron manufacturing plant in Louisiana, a Calpine natural gas fired power plant in California and to a We Energies biomass power plant in Wisconsin...

Backers of the EPA’s climate rules point to the three completed permits as evidence that the process has been relatively seamless so far. Another nine permitting applications are in the queue for the EPA to review or comment on, and the agency is tracking about 80 additional projects that might be subject to the new rules.

“We see absolutely no evidence of any kind of construction moratorium or even delay as a result of this rule,” said Bill Becker, executive director of the National Association of Clean Air Agencies, a coalition of state and local air regulators.

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