Wednesday, June 06, 2007

Smog Watch 2007: the trouble continues

States with smog problems in 2007 through May (29 states plus DC)

Alabama
Arkansas
California
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
New Hampshire
New Jersey
North Carolina
New York
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Vermont
Virginia
West Virginia
Wisconsin

Factoids: Each state listed has recorded at least one monitor with ozone levels worse than current EPA standards. As usual, California had the most dirty-air days: 20 altogether. The highest daily ozone levels have been recorded in Houston (112 parts per billion, May 15) and Bucks County, PA (109 on May 31). The highest one-hour level (166) was recorded in the Houston area May 14. The most dirty-air days (8) at a single monitor have been recorded at Crestline in San Bernadino, CA. Vermont experienced a relatively rare problem May 25. The first monitored problem of the year took place March 16 in the Livingston Parish, LA.

2 comments:

Rocky Mountain Clean Air Action said...

Of course, if you took at ozone levels in the context of the recommendations of health scientists and clean air advisors, that list would probably be around 50. Remember, scientists now say that ozone concentrations as low as 60 parts per billion pose serious health risks. Current federal health standards are set at 80 parts per billion.

Here in Colorado, Denver has had more days rise above 60 parts per billion so far this year than in most years past, http://denverozone.blogspot.com/2007/05/ozone-trends-on-rise.html. We're certainly not breathing easy.

Rocky Mountain Clean Air Action said...

Of course, if that list included all states where ozone levels have risen above 60 parts per billion, which is what clean air advisors and health scientists now say is needed to protect human health, you'd probably have all 50.

Like here in Colorado, where ozone levels are climbing above 60 parts per billion more often than ever in recent times, http://denverozone.blogspot.com/2007/05/ozone-trends-on-rise.html

The air may not be "unhealthy" in the eyes of our regulations, but that doesn't mean we're breathing any easier.